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10
Stitched Stationary
I got a new sewing machine recently and took it out today to play around a bit. I didn’t have much fabric so I decided to stitch on paper instead. And in the process, I came up with a couple of fun ideas for stationary designs. (Click the photos to expand.)
Do-It-Yourself:
Either cut your own paper to size, or buy a A7 sized card and A4 sized card from your local paper store.
Stitch the smaller card into the middle of the larger card
Cut hearts from construction paper. I used the 1st grade method of folding the paper and cutting half-hearts along the fold.
Sew the hearts together.
Reinforce your strand of sewn hearts to the corners of your card.
Write a note, and you’re done!
In the spirit of fall, I also decided to try my hand at making a stitched pumpkin. The stitching worked well for the curves running down the round sides. Oh, and I also used the 1st grade method of cutting shapes again for this guy - hey, I’m all about simplicity when trying to make things symmetrical.
This project took less than 15 minutes and was really easy. I highly recommend it if you have your own sewing machine. What other designs could you make? Stitched Stationary
I got a new sewing machine recently and took it out today to play around a bit. I didn’t have much fabric so I decided to stitch on paper instead. And in the process, I came up with a couple of fun ideas for stationary designs. (Click the photos to expand.)
Do-It-Yourself:
Either cut your own paper to size, or buy a A7 sized card and A4 sized card from your local paper store.
Stitch the smaller card into the middle of the larger card
Cut hearts from construction paper. I used the 1st grade method of folding the paper and cutting half-hearts along the fold.
Sew the hearts together.
Reinforce your strand of sewn hearts to the corners of your card.
Write a note, and you’re done!
In the spirit of fall, I also decided to try my hand at making a stitched pumpkin. The stitching worked well for the curves running down the round sides. Oh, and I also used the 1st grade method of cutting shapes again for this guy - hey, I’m all about simplicity when trying to make things symmetrical.
This project took less than 15 minutes and was really easy. I highly recommend it if you have your own sewing machine. What other designs could you make? Stitched Stationary
I got a new sewing machine recently and took it out today to play around a bit. I didn’t have much fabric so I decided to stitch on paper instead. And in the process, I came up with a couple of fun ideas for stationary designs. (Click the photos to expand.)
Do-It-Yourself:
Either cut your own paper to size, or buy a A7 sized card and A4 sized card from your local paper store.
Stitch the smaller card into the middle of the larger card
Cut hearts from construction paper. I used the 1st grade method of folding the paper and cutting half-hearts along the fold.
Sew the hearts together.
Reinforce your strand of sewn hearts to the corners of your card.
Write a note, and you’re done!
In the spirit of fall, I also decided to try my hand at making a stitched pumpkin. The stitching worked well for the curves running down the round sides. Oh, and I also used the 1st grade method of cutting shapes again for this guy - hey, I’m all about simplicity when trying to make things symmetrical.
This project took less than 15 minutes and was really easy. I highly recommend it if you have your own sewing machine. What other designs could you make? Stitched Stationary
I got a new sewing machine recently and took it out today to play around a bit. I didn’t have much fabric so I decided to stitch on paper instead. And in the process, I came up with a couple of fun ideas for stationary designs. (Click the photos to expand.)
Do-It-Yourself:
Either cut your own paper to size, or buy a A7 sized card and A4 sized card from your local paper store.
Stitch the smaller card into the middle of the larger card
Cut hearts from construction paper. I used the 1st grade method of folding the paper and cutting half-hearts along the fold.
Sew the hearts together.
Reinforce your strand of sewn hearts to the corners of your card.
Write a note, and you’re done!
In the spirit of fall, I also decided to try my hand at making a stitched pumpkin. The stitching worked well for the curves running down the round sides. Oh, and I also used the 1st grade method of cutting shapes again for this guy - hey, I’m all about simplicity when trying to make things symmetrical.
This project took less than 15 minutes and was really easy. I highly recommend it if you have your own sewing machine. What other designs could you make?

Stitched Stationary

I got a new sewing machine recently and took it out today to play around a bit. I didn’t have much fabric so I decided to stitch on paper instead. And in the process, I came up with a couple of fun ideas for stationary designs. (Click the photos to expand.)

Do-It-Yourself:

  • Either cut your own paper to size, or buy a A7 sized card and A4 sized card from your local paper store.
  • Stitch the smaller card into the middle of the larger card
  • Cut hearts from construction paper. I used the 1st grade method of folding the paper and cutting half-hearts along the fold.
  • Sew the hearts together.
  • Reinforce your strand of sewn hearts to the corners of your card.
  • Write a note, and you’re done!

In the spirit of fall, I also decided to try my hand at making a stitched pumpkin. The stitching worked well for the curves running down the round sides. Oh, and I also used the 1st grade method of cutting shapes again for this guy - hey, I’m all about simplicity when trying to make things symmetrical.

This project took less than 15 minutes and was really easy. I highly recommend it if you have your own sewing machine. What other designs could you make?

36
How to Keep Your Walls Interesting
I love art. All kinds of art. My problem is that there’s not one particular “style” that I love most. Thus, my apartment is a smorgasbord of photography, modern art, and all types of paintings. And my art attention span is that of a three-year-old - I move things around all the time. It’s hard for me to throw down serious money on artwork because I’m not sure if I’ll continue liking it for too long.
That’s why Turning Art is so genius. For $10 (small frames) or $30 (large frames), you can get a subscription to new art at a frequency you choose. It keeps things fresh, no matter if you are displaying it in a home or an office. It’s kind of like Netflix for art, but you get to keep it as long as you want. And if you get attached to it, you can buy it for a discount. So. Freaking. Cool.
And if you have friends over all the time, they will come to assume you are a regular old art collector. (It’s okay to keep them fooled.) How to Keep Your Walls Interesting
I love art. All kinds of art. My problem is that there’s not one particular “style” that I love most. Thus, my apartment is a smorgasbord of photography, modern art, and all types of paintings. And my art attention span is that of a three-year-old - I move things around all the time. It’s hard for me to throw down serious money on artwork because I’m not sure if I’ll continue liking it for too long.
That’s why Turning Art is so genius. For $10 (small frames) or $30 (large frames), you can get a subscription to new art at a frequency you choose. It keeps things fresh, no matter if you are displaying it in a home or an office. It’s kind of like Netflix for art, but you get to keep it as long as you want. And if you get attached to it, you can buy it for a discount. So. Freaking. Cool.
And if you have friends over all the time, they will come to assume you are a regular old art collector. (It’s okay to keep them fooled.)

How to Keep Your Walls Interesting

I love art. All kinds of art. My problem is that there’s not one particular “style” that I love most. Thus, my apartment is a smorgasbord of photography, modern art, and all types of paintings. And my art attention span is that of a three-year-old - I move things around all the time. It’s hard for me to throw down serious money on artwork because I’m not sure if I’ll continue liking it for too long.

That’s why Turning Art is so genius. For $10 (small frames) or $30 (large frames), you can get a subscription to new art at a frequency you choose. It keeps things fresh, no matter if you are displaying it in a home or an office. It’s kind of like Netflix for art, but you get to keep it as long as you want. And if you get attached to it, you can buy it for a discount. So. Freaking. Cool.

And if you have friends over all the time, they will come to assume you are a regular old art collector. (It’s okay to keep them fooled.)

31
These Lulalu clips can be used on any smooth surface (not just a magnetic surface, like many other clips out there) and have a patent-pending adhesive strong enough to hold all kinds of photos, notes, and other materials. I love how bright, cheery and fun they are - not to mention that they are priced nearly half off for the next two days on Fab.com. 
Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of digitizing reminders, photos and notes instead of writing them all down; but it’s nice to have stuff like this around the house for organization or decoration. I’m personally thinking of buying a couple of these to use for sticking my favorite Steve Jobs quotes up on my bathroom mirror for daily inspiration.

These Lulalu clips can be used on any smooth surface (not just a magnetic surface, like many other clips out there) and have a patent-pending adhesive strong enough to hold all kinds of photos, notes, and other materials. I love how bright, cheery and fun they are - not to mention that they are priced nearly half off for the next two days on Fab.com. 

Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of digitizing reminders, photos and notes instead of writing them all down; but it’s nice to have stuff like this around the house for organization or decoration. I’m personally thinking of buying a couple of these to use for sticking my favorite Steve Jobs quotes up on my bathroom mirror for daily inspiration.

21
The High-Strung Pumpkin
I’m all for carving pumpkins, but it’s quite a messy and time-sucking endeavor. Scooping out the guts and seeds, stenciling, carving, etc. So this year, I’m coming up with new ways to make my pumpkins stand out, without the mess and time.
The first, pictured above, took about 15 minutes and only took 1/2” double pointed tacks and colored twine. I used pink twine because I didn’t have another color, but obviously you can use whatever color you’d like.
I simply tacked the border of the face, and then strung twine through the tacks, weaving back and forth twice around each edge. Be sure to knot the twine at the very beginning and at the end, then trim the edges.
I think it makes for a really fun, non-traditional look that will definitely turn a few heads. Another thumb-tacked pumpkin experiment is coming up on the blog soon - stay tuned! The High-Strung Pumpkin
I’m all for carving pumpkins, but it’s quite a messy and time-sucking endeavor. Scooping out the guts and seeds, stenciling, carving, etc. So this year, I’m coming up with new ways to make my pumpkins stand out, without the mess and time.
The first, pictured above, took about 15 minutes and only took 1/2” double pointed tacks and colored twine. I used pink twine because I didn’t have another color, but obviously you can use whatever color you’d like.
I simply tacked the border of the face, and then strung twine through the tacks, weaving back and forth twice around each edge. Be sure to knot the twine at the very beginning and at the end, then trim the edges.
I think it makes for a really fun, non-traditional look that will definitely turn a few heads. Another thumb-tacked pumpkin experiment is coming up on the blog soon - stay tuned! The High-Strung Pumpkin
I’m all for carving pumpkins, but it’s quite a messy and time-sucking endeavor. Scooping out the guts and seeds, stenciling, carving, etc. So this year, I’m coming up with new ways to make my pumpkins stand out, without the mess and time.
The first, pictured above, took about 15 minutes and only took 1/2” double pointed tacks and colored twine. I used pink twine because I didn’t have another color, but obviously you can use whatever color you’d like.
I simply tacked the border of the face, and then strung twine through the tacks, weaving back and forth twice around each edge. Be sure to knot the twine at the very beginning and at the end, then trim the edges.
I think it makes for a really fun, non-traditional look that will definitely turn a few heads. Another thumb-tacked pumpkin experiment is coming up on the blog soon - stay tuned! The High-Strung Pumpkin
I’m all for carving pumpkins, but it’s quite a messy and time-sucking endeavor. Scooping out the guts and seeds, stenciling, carving, etc. So this year, I’m coming up with new ways to make my pumpkins stand out, without the mess and time.
The first, pictured above, took about 15 minutes and only took 1/2” double pointed tacks and colored twine. I used pink twine because I didn’t have another color, but obviously you can use whatever color you’d like.
I simply tacked the border of the face, and then strung twine through the tacks, weaving back and forth twice around each edge. Be sure to knot the twine at the very beginning and at the end, then trim the edges.
I think it makes for a really fun, non-traditional look that will definitely turn a few heads. Another thumb-tacked pumpkin experiment is coming up on the blog soon - stay tuned!

The High-Strung Pumpkin

I’m all for carving pumpkins, but it’s quite a messy and time-sucking endeavor. Scooping out the guts and seeds, stenciling, carving, etc. So this year, I’m coming up with new ways to make my pumpkins stand out, without the mess and time.

The first, pictured above, took about 15 minutes and only took 1/2” double pointed tacks and colored twine. I used pink twine because I didn’t have another color, but obviously you can use whatever color you’d like.

I simply tacked the border of the face, and then strung twine through the tacks, weaving back and forth twice around each edge. Be sure to knot the twine at the very beginning and at the end, then trim the edges.

I think it makes for a really fun, non-traditional look that will definitely turn a few heads. Another thumb-tacked pumpkin experiment is coming up on the blog soon - stay tuned!

52
The iPumpkin
After yesterday’s High Strung Pumpkin experiment, I got so excited about pumpkin decorating that I decided to try my hand at stencil painting. And, being the Apple nerd I am, of course I had to dedicate my pumpkin to Steve. 
Without counting the dry time of the paint (which was only about an hour), this took me a total of five minutes to complete. I was tempted to go back to the store to buy several more pumpkins to decorate because it was so easy!
Supplies:
Pumpkin of your choosing
Rust-Oleum Multi-Purpose Spray Paint, Primer ($7)
3M Super 77 Multipurpose Adhesive ($12)
Printed design
Scotch tape
How-To:
Print and cut out a design of your choice. I used this Apple logo and scaled it to 55% of the size before printing, to better fit the face of my pumpkin. Play around with the size until it looks like a good fit on your pumpkin.
Use the spray adhesive to coat the back of your design, and then bond to your pumpkin’s face. It’s okay if you have to wrinkle some parts of the design to mold to the roundness of the pumpkin, just try to get out as many as possible and make sure all edges are pressed down firmly so paint doesn’t soak through.
If you want to leave your pumpkin stem in tact, use scotch tape or packing tape to cover.
Lay down newspaper or put pumpkin on a surface that you don’t care about getting dirty. Then lightly coat the entire pumpkin with the primer spray. You can use any colored paint, I just thought that the white really fit the Apple brand. Be sure not to miss the bottom curve of the pumpkin when painting.
Wait about 30 minutes or until paint is dry to the touch. Then remove your stencil and the scotch tape around the stem. (Yes, the beauty of this specific brand of adhesive is that it’s easy to remove.) The paint may take several hours to “completely” dry, so be a bit careful with over-handling. 
That’s it! So easy, right? I think Steve would have approved.
I would love to see what you come up with. Shoot me photos of any pumpkin projects you complete: britmorin@gmail.com. Have fun! The iPumpkin
After yesterday’s High Strung Pumpkin experiment, I got so excited about pumpkin decorating that I decided to try my hand at stencil painting. And, being the Apple nerd I am, of course I had to dedicate my pumpkin to Steve. 
Without counting the dry time of the paint (which was only about an hour), this took me a total of five minutes to complete. I was tempted to go back to the store to buy several more pumpkins to decorate because it was so easy!
Supplies:
Pumpkin of your choosing
Rust-Oleum Multi-Purpose Spray Paint, Primer ($7)
3M Super 77 Multipurpose Adhesive ($12)
Printed design
Scotch tape
How-To:
Print and cut out a design of your choice. I used this Apple logo and scaled it to 55% of the size before printing, to better fit the face of my pumpkin. Play around with the size until it looks like a good fit on your pumpkin.
Use the spray adhesive to coat the back of your design, and then bond to your pumpkin’s face. It’s okay if you have to wrinkle some parts of the design to mold to the roundness of the pumpkin, just try to get out as many as possible and make sure all edges are pressed down firmly so paint doesn’t soak through.
If you want to leave your pumpkin stem in tact, use scotch tape or packing tape to cover.
Lay down newspaper or put pumpkin on a surface that you don’t care about getting dirty. Then lightly coat the entire pumpkin with the primer spray. You can use any colored paint, I just thought that the white really fit the Apple brand. Be sure not to miss the bottom curve of the pumpkin when painting.
Wait about 30 minutes or until paint is dry to the touch. Then remove your stencil and the scotch tape around the stem. (Yes, the beauty of this specific brand of adhesive is that it’s easy to remove.) The paint may take several hours to “completely” dry, so be a bit careful with over-handling. 
That’s it! So easy, right? I think Steve would have approved.
I would love to see what you come up with. Shoot me photos of any pumpkin projects you complete: britmorin@gmail.com. Have fun! The iPumpkin
After yesterday’s High Strung Pumpkin experiment, I got so excited about pumpkin decorating that I decided to try my hand at stencil painting. And, being the Apple nerd I am, of course I had to dedicate my pumpkin to Steve. 
Without counting the dry time of the paint (which was only about an hour), this took me a total of five minutes to complete. I was tempted to go back to the store to buy several more pumpkins to decorate because it was so easy!
Supplies:
Pumpkin of your choosing
Rust-Oleum Multi-Purpose Spray Paint, Primer ($7)
3M Super 77 Multipurpose Adhesive ($12)
Printed design
Scotch tape
How-To:
Print and cut out a design of your choice. I used this Apple logo and scaled it to 55% of the size before printing, to better fit the face of my pumpkin. Play around with the size until it looks like a good fit on your pumpkin.
Use the spray adhesive to coat the back of your design, and then bond to your pumpkin’s face. It’s okay if you have to wrinkle some parts of the design to mold to the roundness of the pumpkin, just try to get out as many as possible and make sure all edges are pressed down firmly so paint doesn’t soak through.
If you want to leave your pumpkin stem in tact, use scotch tape or packing tape to cover.
Lay down newspaper or put pumpkin on a surface that you don’t care about getting dirty. Then lightly coat the entire pumpkin with the primer spray. You can use any colored paint, I just thought that the white really fit the Apple brand. Be sure not to miss the bottom curve of the pumpkin when painting.
Wait about 30 minutes or until paint is dry to the touch. Then remove your stencil and the scotch tape around the stem. (Yes, the beauty of this specific brand of adhesive is that it’s easy to remove.) The paint may take several hours to “completely” dry, so be a bit careful with over-handling. 
That’s it! So easy, right? I think Steve would have approved.
I would love to see what you come up with. Shoot me photos of any pumpkin projects you complete: britmorin@gmail.com. Have fun! The iPumpkin
After yesterday’s High Strung Pumpkin experiment, I got so excited about pumpkin decorating that I decided to try my hand at stencil painting. And, being the Apple nerd I am, of course I had to dedicate my pumpkin to Steve. 
Without counting the dry time of the paint (which was only about an hour), this took me a total of five minutes to complete. I was tempted to go back to the store to buy several more pumpkins to decorate because it was so easy!
Supplies:
Pumpkin of your choosing
Rust-Oleum Multi-Purpose Spray Paint, Primer ($7)
3M Super 77 Multipurpose Adhesive ($12)
Printed design
Scotch tape
How-To:
Print and cut out a design of your choice. I used this Apple logo and scaled it to 55% of the size before printing, to better fit the face of my pumpkin. Play around with the size until it looks like a good fit on your pumpkin.
Use the spray adhesive to coat the back of your design, and then bond to your pumpkin’s face. It’s okay if you have to wrinkle some parts of the design to mold to the roundness of the pumpkin, just try to get out as many as possible and make sure all edges are pressed down firmly so paint doesn’t soak through.
If you want to leave your pumpkin stem in tact, use scotch tape or packing tape to cover.
Lay down newspaper or put pumpkin on a surface that you don’t care about getting dirty. Then lightly coat the entire pumpkin with the primer spray. You can use any colored paint, I just thought that the white really fit the Apple brand. Be sure not to miss the bottom curve of the pumpkin when painting.
Wait about 30 minutes or until paint is dry to the touch. Then remove your stencil and the scotch tape around the stem. (Yes, the beauty of this specific brand of adhesive is that it’s easy to remove.) The paint may take several hours to “completely” dry, so be a bit careful with over-handling. 
That’s it! So easy, right? I think Steve would have approved.
I would love to see what you come up with. Shoot me photos of any pumpkin projects you complete: britmorin@gmail.com. Have fun!

The iPumpkin

After yesterday’s High Strung Pumpkin experiment, I got so excited about pumpkin decorating that I decided to try my hand at stencil painting. And, being the Apple nerd I am, of course I had to dedicate my pumpkin to Steve. 

Without counting the dry time of the paint (which was only about an hour), this took me a total of five minutes to complete. I was tempted to go back to the store to buy several more pumpkins to decorate because it was so easy!

Supplies:

  1. Pumpkin of your choosing
  2. Rust-Oleum Multi-Purpose Spray Paint, Primer ($7)
  3. 3M Super 77 Multipurpose Adhesive ($12)
  4. Printed design
  5. Scotch tape

How-To:

  1. Print and cut out a design of your choice. I used this Apple logo and scaled it to 55% of the size before printing, to better fit the face of my pumpkin. Play around with the size until it looks like a good fit on your pumpkin.
  2. Use the spray adhesive to coat the back of your design, and then bond to your pumpkin’s face. It’s okay if you have to wrinkle some parts of the design to mold to the roundness of the pumpkin, just try to get out as many as possible and make sure all edges are pressed down firmly so paint doesn’t soak through.
  3. If you want to leave your pumpkin stem in tact, use scotch tape or packing tape to cover.
  4. Lay down newspaper or put pumpkin on a surface that you don’t care about getting dirty. Then lightly coat the entire pumpkin with the primer spray. You can use any colored paint, I just thought that the white really fit the Apple brand. Be sure not to miss the bottom curve of the pumpkin when painting.
  5. Wait about 30 minutes or until paint is dry to the touch. Then remove your stencil and the scotch tape around the stem. (Yes, the beauty of this specific brand of adhesive is that it’s easy to remove.) The paint may take several hours to “completely” dry, so be a bit careful with over-handling. 

That’s it! So easy, right? I think Steve would have approved.

I would love to see what you come up with. Shoot me photos of any pumpkin projects you complete: britmorin@gmail.com. Have fun!

39
Happy Monday! My posts will be fairly light this week, as I’ve enrolled in a week-long letterpress class. But, before class kicks off, I have to share these Tetris shaped post-it notes, or as they are calling them to avoid trademark infringement, “Block Notes”, with you. Only $10 for a pack.
Wouldn’t these make for fun (and potential ADD) at work… or, um, letterpress class? ;)

Happy Monday! My posts will be fairly light this week, as I’ve enrolled in a week-long letterpress class. But, before class kicks off, I have to share these Tetris shaped post-it notes, or as they are calling them to avoid trademark infringement, “Block Notes”, with you. Only $10 for a pack.

Wouldn’t these make for fun (and potential ADD) at work… or, um, letterpress class? ;)

54
You may not be a Picasso or Mozart but you don’t have to be. Just create to create. Create to remind yourself you’re still alive. Make stuff to inspire others to make something too. Create to learn a bit more about yourself.
Frederick Terral
This is my inspiration for this week.
44
Letterpress certification class, day one of four. First task: setting type.

It’s good to learn analog crafts as a balance for my digital life.

Anyone have any letterpress project requests for me? :)

Letterpress certification class, day one of four. First task: setting type.

It’s good to learn analog crafts as a balance for my digital life.

Anyone have any letterpress project requests for me? :)

59
Helveticards
For those of you who may not know, Helvetica is looked to by the design community as one of the most classic and well-designed typefaces of all time. You may remember me posting about these Helvetica cookie cutters awhile back. And, you may also remember they were out of stock. (I’m still sad about that.)
But, I’ve just found something ALMOST as awesome that is IN STOCK - a pack of playing cards called Helveticards ($10). 
These playing cards are so much prettier than the traditional cards. And, since everyone should own at least one pack of playing cards (hey, you never know when you might want to play a quick game of WAR or Hold ‘Em), I urge you to be a trend setter and use these instead. (Pro tip: Also a great stocking stuffer for the holidays!)

Helveticards

For those of you who may not know, Helvetica is looked to by the design community as one of the most classic and well-designed typefaces of all time. You may remember me posting about these Helvetica cookie cutters awhile back. And, you may also remember they were out of stock. (I’m still sad about that.)

But, I’ve just found something ALMOST as awesome that is IN STOCK - a pack of playing cards called Helveticards ($10). 

These playing cards are so much prettier than the traditional cards. And, since everyone should own at least one pack of playing cards (hey, you never know when you might want to play a quick game of WAR or Hold ‘Em), I urge you to be a trend setter and use these instead. (Pro tip: Also a great stocking stuffer for the holidays!)

36
DIY Halloween Hostess Gift (Made In 10 Minutes Or Less!)
Heading to a Halloween party tonight and don’t have anything interesting to bring the hostess? I was in the same pickle last night and came up with an easy (and cute!) solution, made in literally 10 minutes, using only objects I already had around my house.
Materials:
One piece of white or beige felt (fabric would work too - even an old t-shirt) cut in a 12-inch square.
One black hairband or rubberband (a ribbon would also work)
Sharpie marker
Parchment paper, newspaper, tissue paper… or, any type of paper :)
A bottle of wine, or the libation of your choosing.
Optional: Black felt or fabric
Optional: Thread
Instructions:
Wad whatever paper you decide to use (I used parchment paper) into a small ball, which will act as the ghost’s head. 
Place wad of paper on top of wine bottle and cover with felt square. 
Attach hair band around neck of wine bottle, wherever you think looks right in order for the ghost to have a long face.
Using your Sharpie, mark eyes and a ghostly mouth.
NOTE: If you are out of time, you can stop here, and you will still have a cute ghost. If you want to polish it up a bit, read on.
With your black felt or fabric, cut out circles for the ghost’s eyes and mouth. Try to match the size of the circles you drew on the felt.
Remove the felt from the bottle. The circles you drew now act as a stencil for you to stitch your cut circles onto.
Use a sewing machine or hand stitch your black cut circles onto the felt. (Pro tip: My machine was threaded with white thread and I didn’t have time to re-thread it with black thread, so I just Sharpie’d over the white thread once I was done sewing.)
Re-configure the felt back onto your bottle using your paper and hairband.
That’s it! I was pleasantly surprised with how it came out, as was the hostess I ended up gifting the bottle to. Have a great Halloween night!

DIY Halloween Hostess Gift (Made In 10 Minutes Or Less!)

Heading to a Halloween party tonight and don’t have anything interesting to bring the hostess? I was in the same pickle last night and came up with an easy (and cute!) solution, made in literally 10 minutes, using only objects I already had around my house.

Materials:

  1. One piece of white or beige felt (fabric would work too - even an old t-shirt) cut in a 12-inch square.
  2. One black hairband or rubberband (a ribbon would also work)
  3. Sharpie marker
  4. Parchment paper, newspaper, tissue paper… or, any type of paper :)
  5. A bottle of wine, or the libation of your choosing.
  6. Optional: Black felt or fabric
  7. Optional: Thread

Instructions:

  1. Wad whatever paper you decide to use (I used parchment paper) into a small ball, which will act as the ghost’s head. 
  2. Place wad of paper on top of wine bottle and cover with felt square. 
  3. Attach hair band around neck of wine bottle, wherever you think looks right in order for the ghost to have a long face.
  4. Using your Sharpie, mark eyes and a ghostly mouth.
  5. NOTE: If you are out of time, you can stop here, and you will still have a cute ghost. If you want to polish it up a bit, read on.
  6. With your black felt or fabric, cut out circles for the ghost’s eyes and mouth. Try to match the size of the circles you drew on the felt.
  7. Remove the felt from the bottle. The circles you drew now act as a stencil for you to stitch your cut circles onto.
  8. Use a sewing machine or hand stitch your black cut circles onto the felt. (Pro tip: My machine was threaded with white thread and I didn’t have time to re-thread it with black thread, so I just Sharpie’d over the white thread once I was done sewing.)
  9. Re-configure the felt back onto your bottle using your paper and hairband.

That’s it! I was pleasantly surprised with how it came out, as was the hostess I ended up gifting the bottle to. Have a great Halloween night!

92
A Water Fountain For Your Tap
The Tapi squeeze drink fountain is a $5 rubber gadget you attach to your sink that lets you use the tap as normal OR, by squeezing, turns your sink into a water fountain.
It’s great for both rinsing your mouth or taking a few gulps, all in a hygienic way. And it comes in more than 10 colors, which is obviously a selling point in itself.

A Water Fountain For Your Tap

The Tapi squeeze drink fountain is a $5 rubber gadget you attach to your sink that lets you use the tap as normal OR, by squeezing, turns your sink into a water fountain.

It’s great for both rinsing your mouth or taking a few gulps, all in a hygienic way. And it comes in more than 10 colors, which is obviously a selling point in itself.

40
A Conversation Starter For The Streets
That’s it. I think I’m going to trade my smart car in and get this rickshaw instead. I actually never knew that Anthropologie made such things, but really… be still my heart, I’m in love. It’s like a rideable party - there are lights, streamers, and bells (but no whistles). And Pixel would fit perfectly under the canopy. If only it had an iPhone holder for the handle bars…

A Conversation Starter For The Streets

That’s it. I think I’m going to trade my smart car in and get this rickshaw instead. I actually never knew that Anthropologie made such things, but really… be still my heart, I’m in love. It’s like a rideable party - there are lights, streamers, and bells (but no whistles). And Pixel would fit perfectly under the canopy. If only it had an iPhone holder for the handle bars…

473
I laser etched some conference room signs for the guys at Path the other day. I had never used the laser for photo engraving until then. I think they turned out well, would you agree?
Oh, and if you couldn’t tell, they are naming their conference rooms after famous designers. (The signs featuring Dustin and Dave are just for their respective offices.)
It was a fun project. But then again, I tend to like anything that has to do with combining wood, fire, and art. I laser etched some conference room signs for the guys at Path the other day. I had never used the laser for photo engraving until then. I think they turned out well, would you agree?
Oh, and if you couldn’t tell, they are naming their conference rooms after famous designers. (The signs featuring Dustin and Dave are just for their respective offices.)
It was a fun project. But then again, I tend to like anything that has to do with combining wood, fire, and art. I laser etched some conference room signs for the guys at Path the other day. I had never used the laser for photo engraving until then. I think they turned out well, would you agree?
Oh, and if you couldn’t tell, they are naming their conference rooms after famous designers. (The signs featuring Dustin and Dave are just for their respective offices.)
It was a fun project. But then again, I tend to like anything that has to do with combining wood, fire, and art.

I laser etched some conference room signs for the guys at Path the other day. I had never used the laser for photo engraving until then. I think they turned out well, would you agree?

Oh, and if you couldn’t tell, they are naming their conference rooms after famous designers. (The signs featuring Dustin and Dave are just for their respective offices.)

It was a fun project. But then again, I tend to like anything that has to do with combining wood, fire, and art.